Holacracy and Hell

org chartI read an interesting article in The New York Times recently that got me thinking about leadership. The article featured Tony Tsieh, the CEO of Zappos— a work/life integration hero to many of us—and his struggle to implement “Holacracy”. Now, if you haven’t heard of Holacracy, a simple online search will have you buried in more than you probably wish to know. But the thinking goes that people work better, more productively and more happily without all the bosses. Rather than a strict hierarchy, there are roles and teams (“circles”), and authority is distributed throughout an organization. As David Gelles put it in his article, “the goal of Holacracy is to create a dynamic workplace where everyone has a voice and bureaucracy doesn’t stifle innovation.” Read more Holacracy and Hell

Everything DiSC as a graduation present

Recent grad with Everything DiSCHave you considered giving the Everything DiSC Workplace to a recent graduate? I just did that. I have a young friend who received both her high school diploma and associates degree this year. I thought she would find the results interesting and it would be something we could talk about when she came to visit.

She didn’t take the assessment right away and I was a little worried that she thought it was a stupid gift. When I asked her about her results, however, this is what she had to say:

“It’s elaborate. Usually you get a vague outline that’s just enough to be applicable.”

Read more Everything DiSC as a graduation present

Another experience with DiSC

Built into my experience of DiSC is a cautionary tale about using the tools in employment screening. My first exposure to any DiSC assessment was almost a decade ago. Assessment solutions were not new to me by any means, but at the time DiSC was not on my radar. In my case, the department head where I was all but certain to land my next gig wanted me to sample the assessment as I would be working with it frequently in the course of helping clients. I happily obliged. Then it struck me: I wonder if she wants to see my results before officially offering me the position. (After years of education reinforcing “critical thinking” this notion could hardly be construed as paranoid delusion.)

DiSC Classic 1.0With that thought tucked in the back of my mind, I took the assessment. I came out an “S”—or what we might have even called a “high S” since this was back in the days of the vastly outmoded DiSC Classic 1.0 Graph I, II and III and the questionable natural/adaptive concepts.

The trouble? This wasn’t really me. This wasn’t my true style. While the outcome caused no harm, it didn’t help me at all either.

Read more Another experience with DiSC

Our top 10 blog posts

DiSC Comparison Report with a rose and chocolates
Showing some love for Everything DiSC

10 most shared posts

  1. Understanding our D-style colleagues and friends
  2. DiSC word clouds
  3. Understanding our S-style colleagues and friends
  4. Understanding our i-style colleagues and friends
  5. Everything DiSC and holiday stress
  6. You’ve been asked to complete a DiSC profile. Now what?
  7. Understanding our C-style colleagues and friends
  8. Test your knowledge of DiSC styles
  9. Activities for Work of Leaders trainings
  10. What I’ve learned DiSC over the years

What do you think it means that the D-style is more shared than the C? Are the Ds harder to understand? Are they more likely to search for their own style? (Our analytics seem to show this to be true.) Are the Cs less likely to share their style with others?

10 most read posts

  1. DiSC profile questionnaire
  2. Understanding our D-style colleagues and friends
  3. Understanding our C-style colleagues and friends
  4. DiSC training activities
  5. Understanding our i-style colleagues and friends
  6. You’ve been asked to complete a DiSC profile. Now what?
  7. Understanding our S-style colleagues and friends
  8. DiSC – Day in the Life Activity
  9. Which DiSC is DiSC? Different DISC tests explained.
  10. Which DiSC profiles make the best leaders?

What have been your favorite posts? What would you like us to write about?

Games and Activities with QuikDiSC Card Deck

QuikDiSC CardsQuikDiSC cards are divided into four color-coded groups of 32 cards each. Each group has four sets of eight words that describe D, i, S, or C behavioral dimensions.

Get to Know Me/Get to Know You

For groups of ten or more, with participants sitting at at least two tables. Requires one box of cards for every 5 participants. Read more Games and Activities with QuikDiSC Card Deck