Everything DiSC or DISC Insights?

We’ve had a few customers ask us about the difference between our DiSC and other DISC products. It can be confusing, so let’s take a step back and look at the DISC model.

 

The DISC model

The DISC model is the foundation from which all DISC-related products are created. The DISC model was developed by William Moulton Marston but he never created an assessment from it. Nor did he copyright the concept. So several others have taken his model to create their profiles.

 

Marston theorized that the behavioral expression of emotions could be categorized into four primary types, stemming from the person’s perceptions of self in relationship to his or her environment. These four types were labeled by Marston as Dominance (D), Inducement (I), Submission (S), and Compliance (C).

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Quiz: DiSC style and conflict

DiSC styles during conflict

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Try another one: Quiz: Test your knowledge of DiSC styles

 

Review the DiSC styles:
Your answers are highlighted below.
Question 1
A C-style is more likely to display this unhealthy behavior:  
A
Gloss over problems
B
Cave in to avoid tension
C
Become overly dramatic
D
Overpower with logic and facts
Question 2
When in conflict with a C, remember
A
not to insist on immediate resolution
B
to show you're optimistic about your ability to come to resolution
C
to project confidence in your argument
Question 3
Which style is most likely to dwell on wounded relationships?
A
D
B
DC or CD
C
iS or Si
D
CS or SC
Question 4
A D-style might deal with conflict by
A
avoiding emotional situations
B
looking to even the score
C
gossiping
D
remaining very calm
Question 5
When in conflict with an S, remember to
A
make your argument based on data
B
keep your focus on the bottom line
C
lay out your argument in a step-by-step manner
D
let your passion show
Question 6
When in conflict with an i, remember to
A
follow up to make sure the issue is resolved
B
refrain from making emotional appeals
C
be direct and dispassionate
D
make it clear that your relationship is still strong even after difficult confrontations
Question 7
On a team, which style is more likely to try to draw out the perspectives of everyone?
A
Di or iD
B
S
C
i
D
DC or CD
Question 8
An S style is more likely to
A
stick up for own rights
B
speak up about problems
C
listen to others' perspectives
D
become passive-aggressive
Question 9
When in conflict with a D, it's good to
A
avoid direct confrontation
B
avoid viewing his or her directness as a personal attack
C
emphasize the logic behind your argument
D
express a concern for his or her feelings
Question 10
Which style is most likely to address issues head on?
A
S
B
iS or Si
C
C
D
Di or iD
Once you are finished, click the button below. Any items you have not completed will be marked incorrect. Get Results
There are 10 questions to complete.

 

Commanding leaders (and Everything DiSC)

The commanding leadership style is the last of our continuing examination of the 8 dimensions of leadership. No matter what our own style of leadership, we all have something to learn from the styles that come more easily to others.

 

Who is a commanding leader?

 

Commanding leaders tend to be competitive, driven, and assertive. Their confident style might be the one you first think of when you think “leader” and therefore be seen as a natural leader.

 

Commanding leaders are extremely motivated to get results. This can create a sense of positive urgency or a stamping on the feelings and needs of subordinates. They’re often seen as ambitious, assertive, and competitive. At their worst they’re seen as forceful and egotistical.
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Management: What can you teach new managers?

A great employee, a great technical expert, a great accountant, a great sales associate should make a great manager, right? Maybe not. I think we all know that management requires a set of skills and tasks that aren’t always easily picked up. Great managers have usually had some training, good feedback, and mentorship. So what can be done to get new managers what they need? How can you help struggling managers? How can you help good managers become great?

 

How can you help your managers?

 

When I became a manager I took several classes that covered company HR policies with an emphasis on policies for unionized, reviewed the mission statement, went over the company employee evaluation forms, and got some handouts. Most of this information was important, but I didn’t learn how to manage. What would have helped me?

 

Develop self-knowledge

Knowing and reflecting on how I managed myself and discovering where I struggled with others would have helped. How do organize my day? How good of a communicator am I? What motivates me? How comfortable am I in directing someone’s actions? How do I deal with conflict? DiSC provides a few tools that can help here. Everything DiSC Management can help a manager build a more accurate concept of himself as a manager, by focusing on common management behaviors such a delegating tasks or motivating staff.

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What is management?

You can support your own managers by helping them understand their roles and what management means in your organization. If you’re planning to give the Everything DiSC Management profile to your managers, you might want to discuss what they believe a good manager does, what responsibilities they have and what actions they take.

 

What is management?

 

There are many definitions of management and it is often confused with leadership. One manager’s job might look very different from another manager in a different building. While managers can certainly be leaders, let’s look at just a couple simple lists of what a manager does.

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